Category: Collaboration

enteprise-mobile-secuirtyIn a post on ReadWriteEnterprise, guest author Vijay Dheap, Mobile Security Strategist at IBM, outlines how organizations can effectively implement a mobile risk management strategy. Below is an excerpt of the post, but for the full version please read: The Mobile Enterprise: 4 Steps To Keeping It Secure [Infographic]

Security is a balancing act, especially when it comes to emerging technologies that promise to unlock massive business potential. Each new wave of change requires an enterprise to adapt its security posture, or risk being left behind – or exposed to unmanaged risk.

Mobile is no different.

Given the dynamic nature of the mobile market (see mobile stats in the infographic below), it can be difficult for an enterprise to define a mobile risk management strategy. Organizational inertia alone can lead to...  Read the article

Recently I've found myself reading a number of articles and blog posts decrying the untimely demise of the social business movement. So what do you think, has social for business run its course and now we should just move on, because there's "nothing to see here"? Have businesses given it a good go and, finding no value, are they abandoning their efforts? Okay, right up front here, let me say clearly, social for business is not only not dead, it's thriving and delivering lots of value to businesses! In fact, I believe that the changes associated with social business are absolutely critical for businesses in the information age if they want to attract and retain the best employees and partners and if they want to meet the expectations of their customers. In our last social business survey conducted Summer 2012, we found that 67% of North American businesses were already using some social tools for business, up from 42% the prior year. So if that's true, why all the doom and gloom predictions?

I think that there's still a general lack of understanding around what social business is and isn't. If you think it's just about implementing / using new technology your wrong, social business isn't a new marketing campaign on,..  Read the article

assembly lineI know, we are now in 2013, and announcing anything for a past date falls short from being a prediction. But as we are struggling to help organizations transform to adapt to uncertainty, I often find myself thinking that we already did that and went there before, when considering where social business is heading to. Whether on the technological or on the conceptual side, much buzz is made which takes us back from the future. There are many reasons for that, the simplest one being the necessity to survive in present industrial logic while setting the basis to allow businesses to thrive in a wirearchy. New technologies and emergent behaviors must make their way into our dominant top-down, production-based, model before being able to give birth to a model well-suited to complexity and to a knowledge-based era. Yet, most of the trends which shape the social business landscape seem to pull us back into a “déjà vu” draped in new clothes, like a jay dressed in peacock feather. Predicting sometimes looks like diving deeper into a dull past… This article will deal with the technological aspect of this shilly-shallying, while I will consider the conceptual side in another post.

As I began collecting ideas for this post, Bertrand Duperrin published...

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Author: Jacob Morgan Posted: December 05, 2012 926 views

Based on a research report Chess Media Group released last year on the State of Enterprise 2.0 Collaboration, the most common types of IT resistance to collaboration are: it’s not a priority, there are security issues or threats, no manpower, and no budget.  Let’s take a look at each one in more detail and explore how to deal with them when they come up.

It’s Not a Priority

As with the manager resistance, fear and lack of education are a factor in why this isn’t a priority.  However, it’s true there are situations in which an organization is focused on other projects and needs to wait until they are completed before investing in something else.  I would recommend asking the IT folks why this isn’t a priority.  I have also found that bringing business and IT professionals together to discuss priorities often makes for interesting and enlightening discussions.  If employees and executives decide that effective collaboration and communication is a priority, IT usually follows.  You don’t want to separate IT from the decision-making process as their approval and input are integral.  Bring them into the conversation and try to understand their perspective.  Sometimes IT leads the collaboration initiative and team members in this department may not all agree on things such as security or feasibility.  Education is also a crucial...

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Author: Jacob Morgan Posted: November 05, 2012 625 views
I’m not quite sure when this happened but at some point we began relying more on technology to make decisions for us and less on people.  How many times have we been faced with a situation were a customer service representative tells us, “I’m sorry the system won’t let us do that.”  Oftentimes there is a logical reason for why you need something done or changed and the system just doesn’t allow that to happen so you end up trying to find a workaround which ends up causing more problems in the end.  Most of us experience this daily in one way or another; whether we are dealing with flight upgrades, purchasing a product at a store, or going to the gym.  Technology ultimately drives virtually everything we do.
We rely on technology to tell us how to deal with and how to interact with people which can become a problem. What’s a bigger problem is the fact that people are designing these systems to make sure that the technology keeps us from coloring outside of the lines.
Eventually this will lead to the death of human decision making altogether.  Technology exists to help support human decision making, to provide alternative options, to help analyze decisions, and to help guide the decision making process; not to take it over entirely.  It’s actually a bit scary because if we continue to go down this path it’s hard to not imagine a future where we ultimately just act out the behaviors or actions that technology tells us to.  In other words technology ...  Read the article

Reconciling Organizational Improvement and Reinvention Through Social Business Design

This post is the second of a two-parts article on innovation and social business co-written with Ralph-Christian Ohr (@ralph_ohr).

A striking change of focus in the social business arena occurred during the last five years. Despite the fact that Andrew McAfee’s original definition specified its scope as «within companies, or between companies and their partners or customers», infant Enterprise 2.0 was mainly concerned by internal collaboration. The teaser from one of the major events of this early period, the Boston 2007 Enterprise 2.0 Conference, talked about “(…) the technologies and business practices that liberate the workforce from the constraints of legacy communication and productivity tools like email“.

This somehow navel-gazing vision of firms, obsessed by internal processes and employees’ performance, has shifted toward a customer-centric attitude. Apart from acknowledging that organizations more and more see the benefits, if not the imperative, to operate as connected ecosystems, including partners, suppliers, customers, and even competitors, in their value creation mechanisms, this profound change mirrors the evolution of our understanding of the way business is done in our hyper-connected era. Yet, putting such a strong emphasis on customers, on their needs and expectations, is at risk of obscuring the role played by...

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Business Model Innovation as Wicked Problem

This post is the first of a two-parts article on innovation and social business co-written with Ralph-Christian Ohr (@ralph_ohr) and cross-posted from collaborativeinnovation.org.

We live in an age where emergent technologies continue to have massive effects on business and society. Rising complexity requires companies and economies to cope with increasingly interlocking systems. If we keep on considering systems in a traditional, isolated way, this would lead to a totally locked view of business. This new hyper-connected nature of information entails an unprecedented change in business and societal environments. One major consequence for companies is the imperative to learn to anticipate those changes as well as to successfully adapt to them, or being at risk of disappearing.

The business model is the new unit of design

The life time of business models is declining. Organizations are forced to reinvent themselves more and more frequently in order to survive and thrive. This implicates the creation and pursuit of new businesses while maintaining and improving existing businesses – sustainable success depends on a proper integration of evolutionary and revolutionary innovation.

A recent Arthur D. Little study has found...

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Author: Ross Dawson Posted: October 19, 2012 656 views

On October 25 in New York City I will run a workshop on Crowdsourcing for Marketing in Enterprise  Agencies as part of the global Crowdsourcing Week workshop series. The following day I will run a workshop that is highly complementary, on Crowdsourcing for Media and Content.

Following on from the broad-based first edition of Getting Results From Crowds, one of the most important topics I have been delving into is the application of crowdsourcing to marketing. The New York workshop will go into the topic in detail, including the primary applications, extensive case studies, industry perspectives, analysis of crowdsourced marketing platforms, approaches to building your own crowds, effective strategies for creative agencies to tap the rise of crowdsourcing, and more.

Just as the field of crowdsourcing is far broader than most people appreciate (with 22 categories in our Crowdsourcing Landscape), there are many ways in which crowdsourcing can be applied to marketing.

There are 7 major applications of crowdsourcing to marketing:

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A couple of weeks ago, my face hurt. Really, really bad. So I went to the doctors office expecting to spend the first half hour of my visit filling out all of the obligatory paperwork. I was surprised to find, then, that gone where the paper forms and instead my data was collected and tracked electronically. My doctor and I spent more time interacting, addressing my problem and coming up with a solution. And as a result it was a much more enriching experience.

It struck me that if the medical industry, which has a history of being a system of records and paper files, can recognize the importance of enabling...  Read the article

“Increasingly, strategic advantage for corporate institutions will hinge on privileged positions in relevant concentrations of high-value knowledge flows and the adoption of practices required to participate in and profit from these knowledge flows”.

By these words, John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Lang Davidson define in The Power of Pull what they call the second wave of the Big Shift. Their impressive concept and research have already been thoroughly and brilliantly commented. Social business, or whatever we call it, has the potential to drive us through the necessary changes to harness flows of knowledge and take fully advantage of human collaboration and creativity.

Are we stuck in a document-based view of the firm?

But to fulfill this promise, thus to trigger the third wave of...

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